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Welcome to the Nile Collective website!  Check back here often to see the current medicinal marijuana menu (menu changes rapidly, all listed items are subject to availability). Located on 1501 Pacific Ave in the Heart of Venice, CA, we open daily at 10 daily. Patients that come by between 4:20 P.M. and 5:20 P.M. get a free GRAM with a 2 gram donation. Every nite from 6PM to 8Pm is the patient appreciation hour, buy two strains and get the 3RD one free (1 per patient).

Connecticut medical marijuana activists want whole flower, not ground-up plant

Marijuana activists in Connecticut are asking the Department of Consumer Protection to offer whole cannabis buds in the state’s medical marijuana program, rather than ground-up plants.

Peter Mould of North Haven is executive director of Connecticut NORML, which advocates for reform of marijuana laws. He and others claim that homogenizing the plant, which the state requires, results in “the degradation of the cannabinoids, the actual essential oils that are in the flower,” Mould said.

Mould has posted a petition at change.org (search for “medical marijuana CT”), which states: “We request that you please change your regulations to allow producers to sell the bud-form to dispensaries, in order to enable patients to have their high-quality medicine.”

“The patient community is suffering because of this,” Mould said.

Medical marijuana became available in Connecticut in September, although not all of the four growing facilities have product to distribute yet. It requires that the marijuana be tested by a lab and packaged like a traditional medicine. Patients can buy it through any of six dispensaries if they suffer from one of 11 conditions, including glaucoma, cancer and Crohn’s disease.

But Mould called the final product basically “ground-up dust” and said, “I completely understand why they’re trying to do it, but it doesn’t make sense with cannabis.” He said he is registered to buy medical marijuana for back injuries. “I suffer from spasms every day of my life,” he said.

“It was deplorable,” Mould said of the medical marijuana. “I vaporize and it’s deplorable.”

Colin Souney of Guilford, who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, agreed with Mould that ground-up marijuana “deteriorates. It’s just like the vegetable sitting in the grocery store,” which loses its nutrients if chopped up.

He said of the state-controlled product: “The effect is short, the feeling in your mouth is not pleasant and, unfortunately, if you consume it two or three days in a row it no longer has an effect,” Souney said.

Another issue is price. Twenty dollars per gram, which is the price at Bluepoint Wellness of Connecticut in Branford, “is an outrageous price,” Souney said.

Nick Tamborrino, CEO of Bluepoint Wellness, declined to comment.

Marghie Giuliano, executive vice president of the Connecticut Pharmacists Association, said it’s too early in the program, with just one growing facility producing cannabis, to judge the effectiveness of the state’s product.

“There’s a gap in clinical evidence,” Giuliano said. “The purpose of the medical marijuana program in Connecticut is really to make sure the product is safe.” She said producers and dispensaries will cooperate in studies of the homogenized marijuana.

Most of the 22 other states, plus the District of Columbia, that have approved medical marijuana allow residents to grow their own, in limited quantities. Michelle Seagull, deputy commissioner of the DCP, said the department decided to use a medical model for marijuana rather than just regulating the way marijuana has traditionally been grown and sold.

“We require that the marijuana in Connecticut be lab-tested and that it be listed with the active ingredients,” she said. Seagull said buds can have different levels of cannabinoids, such as THC and CBD, “even within a single plant.”

Besides giving patients a consistent product, homogenization is necessary, Seagull said, because different levels of active ingredients are more effective on some conditions than on others.

“I can’t speak to whether it actually reduces potency and, if so, how much,” Seagull said. “If you’re a patient, there are going to be certain active ingredient levels you need,” which will be listed on the label, she said.

Seagull said the petition has not been presented to the DCP yet but there are no plans to change the medical marijuana program. “I believe the way we’re doing it is the appropriate medical model,” she said.

 

By Ed Stannard, New Haven Register

Lets Celebrate Chocolate Day!

There are a number of dates throughout the year promoting variations of local, national or international Chocolate Day – our research leads us to believe that this is the true, definitive, purist ‘Chocolate Day‘, so celebrate with some of the high cocoa, rich, dark chocolate that makes you go tingly inside… Or failing that, stock up on Gracie’s chocolate melts, ice-cream and enjoy a day of secret treats and indulgence…

5 Diseases Proven To Respond Better To Cannabis Than Prescription Drugs

original blog available at http://www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com/5-diseases-proven-to-respond-better-to-cannabis-than-prescription-drugs/
The reason cannabis is so effective medicinally is directly related to its ability to interact with receptors in the body which inhibit inflammation and prevent disease. Cannabis does this so well, that few drugs can compete with its level of potency which come essentially with no side effects. These are just 5 diseases that are proven to respond better to cannabis than to drugs, however, there are many studies currently being conducted that may prove dozens more.

Many researchers have noted that there was “inadequate” data for decaded to determine whether smoked marijuana was safe or effective in treating symptoms of pain and preventing disese. The primary reason for the s lack of data had to do with the National Institute on Drug Abuse, or NIDA, which was the only source of cannabis for research and they were blocking the most meaningful studies due to close ties with pharmaceutical companies.

This view was supported by Dr. David Bearman, the executive vice president for the Academy of Cannabinoid Medicine/Society of Cannabis Clinicians. “Part of the problem in the United States is that the NIDA has blocked almost all meaningful studies on cannabis,” Bearman said. Bearman argues that while synthetic cannabis pills do offer pain relief, marijuana is cheaper, has fewer side effects and can be more effective.

Now decades of propaganda is being reversed as scientists and the public are being exposed to the true potential of cannabis and its ability to both heal and prevent disease.

Excellent cannabis strains which treat various medical conditions include Charlotte’s Web, Harlequin,Sour Tsunami and Cannatonic.

Noting cannabis’ vastly superior side effect profile DEA Administrative Law Judge, Francis L. Young, after a two-year hearing to reschedule cannabis in 1998 said:

Nearly all medicines have toxic, potentially lethal effects. But marijuana is not such a substance. There is no record in the extensive medical literature describing a proven, documented cannabis-induced fatality… In strict medical terms marijuana is far safer than many foods we commonly consume … Marijuana, in its natural form, is one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man.

5 DISEASES PROVEN TO RESPOND BETTER TO CANNABIS THAN PRESCRIPTION DRUGS
1. Cancer

Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana, inhibit tumor growth and also kill cancer cells. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive constituent (or cannabinoid) of the cannabis plant, targets cannabinoid receptors similar in function to endocannabinoids, which are cannabinoids that are naturally produced in the body and activate these receptors.

Researchers have now found that cannabidiol has the ability to ‘switch off’ the gene responsible for metastasis in an aggressive form of cancer. Importantly, this substance does not produce the psychoactive properties of the cannabis plant.

A Spanish team, led by Dr Manuel Guzmon, wanted to see whether they could prevent a form of cancer (glioblastoma multiforme) from growing by cutting off its blood supply. Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the most difficult cancers to treat – it seldom responds to any medical intervention, especially conventional methods which poisoning and primatively destroy cells such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery.

Genes associated with blood vessel growth in tumors through the production of a chemical called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have their activity reduced when exposed to cannabinoids.

Cannabinoids halt VEGF production by producing Ceramide. Ceramide controls cell death.

Dr Manuel Guzmon tested a cannabinoid solution of patients had glioblastoma multiforme and had not responded to chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery. The scientists took samples from them before and after treating them with a cannabinoids solution – this was administered directly into the tumor.

Amazingly, both patients experienced reduced VEGF levels in the tumor as a result of treatment with cannabinoids.

A study published in the July 2002 edition of the medical journal Blood, which found that THC and some other cannabinoids produced “programmed cell death” in different varieties of human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines, thereby destroying the cancerous cells but leaving other cells unharmed.

A study published in a 1975 edition of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, which showed that THC slowed the growth of lung cancer, breast cancer and virus-induced leukemia in rats.

Titled Antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids, this study was funded by the US National Institute of Health, and performed by researchers at the Medical College of Virginia. Despite the promising results, no further research was made, and the study has essentially disappeared from the scientific literature.

A 1994 study, which documented that THC may protect against malignant cancers, and which was buried by the US government. The $2 million study, funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services, sought to show that large doses of THC produced cancer in rats. Instead, researchers found that massive doses of THC had a positive effect, actually slowing the growth of stomach cancers. The rats given THC lived longer than their non-exposed counterparts.

he study was unpublished and the results hidden for almost three years, until it was finally leaked to the media in 1997. (CC#17, THC for tumors).
2. Fibromyalgia (FM)

More and more patients with FM are finding effective relief from cannabis.

So say the results of a recent online survey of over 1,300 subjects conducted by The National Pain Foundation and NationalPainReport.com. Among those surveyed, 379 subjects said that they had used cannabis therapeutically. Sixty-two percent of them rated the substance to be “very effective” in the treatment of their condition.

By comparison, among those FM patients who had used Cymbalta (Duloxene), only eight percent rated the drug as “very effective,” and 60 percent said it did “not work at all.” Among those who had used Lyrica (Pregabalin), ten percent said that drug was “very effective,” versus 61 percent who reported no relief. Among those who had used Savella (Milnacipran), ten percent rated the drug as effective, and 68 percent said it was ineffective.

Commenting on the survey results, Dr. Mark Ware — associate professor in family medicine and anesthesia at McGill University in Montreal — told the National Pain Report, “We desperately need someone to step up and explore this potential for the efficacy of cannabis.”

Ware, whose own clinical research has demonstrated inhaled pot’s efficacy in subjects with hard-to-treat refractory pain, added: “The scientific rationale is there. There are some early preliminary, proof-of-concept clinical trials that demonstrate cannabis may be effective. Now your study adds additional weight that patients are reporting that cannabis may be better than the existing therapies. I think that this really should provide incentives for researchers to take a hard look at clinical trials to really explore that in much more detail.”

Some investigators already have. In 2006, German scientists reported that the administration of oral THC significantly reduced both chronic and experimentally induced pain in patients with fibromyalgia. Subjects in the trial were administered daily doses of 2.5 to 15 mg of THC, but received no other pain medication during the study. Among those participants who completed the trial, all reported significant reductions in daily pain and electronically induced pain.

More recently, Spanish researchers assessed the use of cannabis treatment of Fibromyalgia. A cursory review of the results indicates why so many FM patients are preferring pot over pills.

Investigators reported, “The use of cannabis was associated with beneficial effects on some FM symptoms. … After two hours of cannabis use, VAS (visual analogue scales) scores showed a statistically significant reduction of pain and stiffness, enhancement of relaxation, and an increase in somnolence and feeling of well being.”
3. Epilepsy

By far the most common approach to treating epilepsy is to prescribe antiepileptic drugs. Commonly prescribed drugs include clonazepam, phenobarbital, and primidone. Some relatively new epilepsy drugs includetiagabine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, and felbamate. Many medications amplify side effects such as fatigue and decreased appetite. Epilepsy medication also may predispose people to developing depression or psychoses.

Several lines of evidence now suggest that cannabinoid compounds are anticonvulsant and empirical evidence in many children is establishing conclusive evidence that cannabinoid therapy may be the most effective treatment available for epileptics.

In “The Endogenous Cannabinoid System Regulates Seizure Frequency and Duration in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy”, Robyn Wallace explained that the data not only shows the anticonvulsant activity of exogenously applied cannabinoids but also suggests that endogenous cannabinoid tone modulates seizure termination and duration through activation of the CB1 receptor. By demonstrating a role for the endogenous cannabinoid system in regulating seizure activity, these studies define a role for the endogenous cannabinoid system in modulating neuroexcitation. The endogenous cannabinoid system thus provides on-demand protection against acute excitotoxicity in central nervous system neurons.

Anti-convulsant drugs have potentially serious side-effects, including bone softening, reduced production of red blood cells, swelling of the gums, and emotional disturbances. Other occasional effects include uncontrollable rapid eye movements, loss of motor co-ordination, coma and even death. In addition, these medications are far from ideal in that they only completely stop seizures in about 60% of patients. Large amounts of anecdotal reports and patient case studies indicate the assistance of cannabis in controlling seizures. Cannabis analogues have been shown to prevent seizures. Patients report that they can wean themselves off prescription drugs, and still not experience seizures if they have a regular supply of cannabis.

The British company, GW Pharmaceuticals pursued advanced clinical trials for the world’s first pharmaceutical developed from raw marijuana instead of synthetic equivalents. In response to urgent need expressed by parents of children with intractable epilepsy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is now allowing Investigational studies of purified CBD (cannabidiol) for seizures.

Ben Whalley and colleagues at the Center for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics, University of Reading, using mouse models of epilepsy, established safety and showed that CBD and another cannabinoid, CBDV, exert anti-seizure and anti-inflammatory effects. This research came to the attention of families in the US who had loved ones with epilepsy.

The British Medical Association has stated that cannabis may prove useful as an ‘adjunctive therapy’ for patients who cannot be kept satisfactorily free of seizures on current medications. Likewise, the National Institutes of Health workshop considered that this is ‘an area of potential value’, based largely on animal research showing anticonvulsant effects.

Charlotte’s Web is a sativa marijuana strain that has gained popularity as a good option for treating seizures as well as a range of other medical conditions. This medical potency is due to its high-CBD content, which was specifically cultivated by Colorado breeders The Stanley Brothers for a young epileptic patient named Charlotte. This strain is effective with little to no psychoactive effects, making it great for those who don’t want their medication to affect their daily tasks.
4. Multiple Sclerosis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has alerted the public that patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) have developed serious brain infections after taking the drug Gilenya (fingolimod).

Other drugs like Tysabri are antibody treatments designed to block certain white blood cells that cause MS when they attack nerves. the problem is they have a history of also making patients vulnerable to infection. Biogen and Elan yanked theirs off the market after two cases of the brain disease were confirmed among patients taking the drug; a month later, a third case was confirmed. The FDA allowed the drug to return to the market in July 2006 after they stated benefits outweighed the risks, no doubt with some help from Big Pharma.

GW received government approval in 1998 to develop cannabis-based plant extracts. Their flagship product Sativex is a highly defined extract containing an approximately 50-50 mix of CBD and THC that has been approved by regulators in the UK and more than 20 other countries for treating pain and spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis.

Some forms of medical marijuana are proven to alleviate certain symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to guidelines published in the journal Neurology.

In a review of 2,608 studies, the researchers were able to assess which therapies had sufficient evidence to indicate that they may be effective for patients with MS. Overall, researchers discovered that certain forms of medical marijuana — a spray form and a pill form — appeared to have the most evidence indicating they may be helpful in patients with MS.

“What we learned are these specific forms of medical marijuana can ease patients’ symptoms — specific symptoms of spasticity, or muscle stiffness … and helped with frequent urination,”according to study author Dr. Pushpa Narayanaswami.

In a 2011 study, Israeli researchers showed that CBD helps treat MS-like symptomsby preventing immune cells from transforming and attacking the insulating covers of nerve cells in the spinal cord. After inducing an MS-like condition in mice — partially paralyzing their limbs — the researchers injected them with CBD. The mice responded by regaining movement, first twitching their tails and then beginning to walk without a limp. The researchers noted that the mice treated with CBD had much less inflammation in the spinal cord than their untreated counterparts.

In another study in Neuroscience researchers used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, and found that cannabinoids reduced microglia activation, nitrotyrosine formation, T cell infiltration, oligodendrocyte toxicity, myelin loss and axonal damage in the mouse spinal cord white matter and alleviated the clinical scores when given either before or after disease onset.
5. ADHD/ADD

The normal course of treatment for a child diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, is a course of methylphenidate, better known as Ritalin. For the child diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, the side effects of using Ritalin, are many, including psychosis (abnormal thinking or hallucinations), difficulty sleeping, stomach aches, diarrhea, headaches, lack of hunger (leading to weight loss) and dry mouth. In some cases, the use of Ritalin has led to death. Death can be caused due to burst blood vessels, heart failure and fever. Violence is a leading cause of amphetamine-related deaths. Violent tendencies can develop after even regular use.

Children are dying at unprecedented rates from drugs like Ritalain. An excellent documentaryGeneration Rx, details the disturbing and ongoing chemical abuse of children by conventional medicine. The prescription of psychiatric drugs to the masses, specifically children, are altering their minds, bodies and entire lives.

While some apply preconceptions that marijuana exacerbates ADHD almost all California cannabinologists believe cannabis and cannabinoids have substantially improved the lives of ADHD sufferers, and with less negative side effects than common stimulant drug ADHD treatments.

We have come to understand more about the brain and the role of dopamine and the endocannabinoid system we are starting to unravel how cannabis, anandamide and dranabinol act to free up dopamine and decrease the overstimulation of the midbrain.

The results in treating ADHD with cannabis are often spectacular. Patients report grades going from Cs and Ds to As and Bs. Dr. David Bearman, a physician practicing in Santa Barbara, California, reports patients have said, “I graduated from the Maritime Academy because I smoked marijuana,” and “I got my Ph.D. because of smoking marijuana.” Almost universally, ADHD patients who therapeutically used cannabis reported in helped them pay attention in lecture, focus their attention instead of thinking of several ideas almost at the same time, helped them to stay on task and do their homework.

70 percent of the brain’s job is to inhibit sensory input from the other 30 percent. Typical ADHD symptoms include distractability. The most accepted theory about ADHD rests on the fact that about 70% of the brain’s function is to regulate input to the other 30%. The cause of ADHD is probably a decreased ability to suppress sensory input both internal and external input (need a reference here). Basically the brain is overwhelmed with too much information that comes too fast. In ADHD, the brain is cluttered with and too aware of all the nuances of a person’s daily experience. This phenomenon is caused by a dopamine dysfunction.

Since the endocannabinoid system was discovered, many studies revealed that marijuana also modulates the dopamine system and therefore has a potential for ADHD treatment. As recounted in the physicians’ stories below, marijuana may be a safer, less costly, and more effective treatment than anything available from the pharmaceutical companies.

Dr. Claudia Jensen, a 49-year old California pediatrician and mother of 2 teenage daughters, says marijuana might be the best treatment for ADHD. In an interview with the FOD news network, she said:

“Why would anyone want to give their child an expensive pill… with unacceptable side effects, when he or she could just go into the backyard, pick a few leaves off a plant and make tea…?” “Cannabinoids are a very viable alternative to treating adolescents with ADD and ADHD … I have a lot of adult patients who swear by it.”

In her testimony, before the House Committee on Government Reform on Marijuana (2004) Dr. Jensen discussed the practice of recommending marijuana to patients with ADHD in an 11-page statement. Her testimony summarized hundreds of published scientific articles on the safety/efficacy of marijuana that have produced strong scientific evidence that marijuana is an important medicine.

Her reasons for looking to marijuana as treatment for ADHD?

“The other legal drugs used to treat ADD are helpful in many patients, but they all have side effects… the other five of the nine drugs used to treat ADD in this country haven’t even been scientifically tested … for ADD in children. These are drugs for depression and high blood pressure …Of all the drugs use to treat ADD, cannabis has the least number of serious side effects.

Her explanation for why marijuana is opposed by the pharmaceutical companies:

“The real problem with allowing patients to use cannabis as a medication is economics … If cannabis were approved for use in just the ADD/ADHD market alone, it could significantly impact the $1 billion a year sales for traditional ADD/ADHD pharmaceuticals.” Article Sources:

cancerresearchuk.org

leafly.com

preventdisease.com

davidbearmanmd.com

ms-uk.org

medicalmarijuana.com

alternet.org

sciencedaily.com
– See more at: http://www.spiritscienceandmetaphysics.com/5-diseases-proven-to-respond-better-to-cannabis-than-prescription-drugs/#sthash.31WTkFux.dpuf

Sir Paul McCartney turns 72 today, read 20 of his best quotes.

On his 72nd birthday we’ve gathered 20 of Paul McCartney’s best quotes about life, being a musician, The Beatles and… video games?

– One of my biggest thrills for me still is sitting down with a guitar or a piano and just out of nowhere trying to make a song happen.

– I used to think anyone doing anything weird was weird. Now I know that it is the people that call others weird that are weird.

– Somebody said to me, ‘But the Beatles were anti-materialistic’. That’s a huge myth. John and I literally used to sit down and say, ‘Now, let’s write a swimming pool’.

– None of us wanted to be the bass player. In our minds he was the fat guy who always played at the back.

– I don’t work at being ordinary.

– Why would I retire? Sit at home and watch TV? No thanks. I’d rather be out playing.

– It was Elvis who really got me hooked on beat music. When I heard Heartbreak Hotel I thought, this is it.

– I think people who create and write, it actually does flow-just flows from into their head, into their hand, and they write it down. It’s simple.

– If children are studying the 20th century, I’m in their text books.

– There are only four people who knew what the Beatles were about anyway.

– John’s time and effort were, in the main, spent on pretty honourable stuff. As for the other side, well, nobody’s perfect, nobody’s Jesus. And look what they did to him.

– Everybody at EMI had become part of the furniture. I’d be a couch; Coldplay are an armchair. Robbie Williams, I dread to think what he was.

– But with writers, there’s nothing wrong with melancholy. It’s an important colour in writing.

– Being in the audience actually looks like quite a lot of fun.

– My grandkids always beat me at [the video game] Rock Band. And I say, Listen, you may beat me at Rock Band, but I made the original records, so shut up.

– I can take pot or leave it. I got busted in Japan for it. I was nine days without it and there wasn’t a hint of withdrawal, nothing.

– You know, as a kid I would have thought of a vegetarian as a wimp.

– I figure I’ve probably got a better chance of coming up with a good Paul McCartney song than Oasis has.

– The thing with The X Factor is, you don’t have to turn it on. It is really not a bad thing. You are talking about people being on the dole (welfare) – this gets people off the dole. It gives some people an opportunity, it gives them confidence, it gives them work. There is nothing wrong with that.

Originally Published at International Business Times

Happy Birthday Paul McCartney: 20 Great Quotes From The Beatles Frontman

Legendary musician turns 72

– It’s also not unusual for writers to look backward. Because that’s your pool of resources.

 

On this day in 1971, Tupac Shakur was born, the rest is history.

Tupac Amaru Shakur (June 16, 1971 – September 13, 1996), also known by his stage names 2Pac and briefly as Makaveli, was an American rapper and actor.[4] Shakur has sold over 75 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling music artists of all time.[5] MTV ranked him at number two on their list of The Greatest MCs of All Time and Rolling Stone named him the 86th Greatest Artist of All Time.[6] His double disc album All Eyez on Me is one of the best selling hip hop albums of all time. BET named 2Pac the most influential rapper of all time.[7]

Shakur began his career as a roadiebackup dancer, and MC for the alternative hip hop group Digital Underground, eventually branching off as a solo artist.[8][9][10] The themes of most of Shakur’s songs revolved around the violence and hardship in inner cities, racism and other social problems. Both of his parents and several other of his family were members of the Black Panther Party, whose ideals were reflected in his songs.

During the latter part of his career, Shakur was a vocal participant in the so-called East Coast–West Coast hip hop rivalry, becoming involved in conflicts with other rappers, producers and record-label staff members, most notably The Notorious B.I.G. and the labelBad Boy Records.[11]

On September 7, 1996, Shakur was shot multiple times in a drive-by shooting at the intersection of Flamingo Road and Koval Lane inLas VegasNevada.[12] He was taken to the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, where he died six days later.[13]

Study: Alcohol Linked to Psychosis, Not Marijuana

Original story at High Times• 4 mentions • 1 week ago

New research has surfaced that suggests previous studies had it all wrong: it is actually alcohol that increases the chances of developing psychosis, not marijuana.

Researchers from the University of Calgary in Canada recently published these findings in the mental health journal Schizophrenia Research, which outlines a four year journey into the long term effects of commonly used substances: alcohol, tobacco and marijuana, in an attempt to assess the human risk factors associated with the development of psychosis.

In the study, which encompassed a group of 170 participants profiled as having an elevated risk for psychosis, researchers found that marijuana did not contribute to the crazy, so to speak, while alcohol may, in fact, have been the socially acceptable culprit all along.

“Results revealed that low use of alcohol, but neither cannabis use nor tobacco use at baseline, contributed to the prediction of psychosis in the clinical high risk sample,” said lead study author, Dr. Jean Addington, PhD.

Previous studies have indicated for some time that contrary to the American government’s biased science, marijuana consumption does not lead to an increased risk of schizophrenia in otherwise health individuals. In fact, a recent editorial in the Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, Dr. Matthew Hill says that while THC, the psychoactive compound in marijuana, can invoke temporary symptoms of psychosis, like paranoia, these side effects do not linger and are not relative to an actual mental disorder.

“Within the Western world, cannabis use went from essentially nonexistent in the 1950s to extremely prevalent in the 1960s and 1970s. Despite this dramatic shift in cannabis use at a societal level, the prevalence of schizophrenia has largely remained stable.”

Inheritable genetics are still believed to be the primary source of schizophrenia — responsible for about 80 percent of the cases.

Mike Adams writes for  HIGH TIMES, Playboy’s The Smoking Jacket and Hustler Magazine. You can follow him on Twitter @adamssoup and on Facebook/mikeadams73.

How well do you understand the Compassionate Use Act of 1996? Reading this will help

Prop 215

HS 11362.5. (a) This section shall be known and may be cited as the Compassionate Use Act of 1996.

(b) (1) The people of the State of California hereby find and declare that the purposes of the Compassionate Use Act of 1996 are as follows:

(A) To ensure that seriously ill Californians have the right to obtain and use marijuana for medical purposes where that medical use is deemed appropriate and has been recommended by a physician who has determined that the person’s health would benefit from the use of marijuana in the treatment of cancer, anorexia, AIDS, chronic pain, spasticity, glaucoma, arthritis, migraine, or any other illness for which marijuana provides relief.

(B) To ensure that patients and their primary caregivers who obtain and use marijuana for medical purposes upon the recommendation of a physician are not subject to criminal prosecution or sanction.

(C) To encourage the federal and state governments to implement a plan to provide for the safe and affordable distribution of marijuana to all patients in medical need of marijuana.

(2) Nothing in this section shall be construed to supersede legislation prohibiting persons from engaging in conduct that endangers others, nor to condone the diversion of marijuana for nonmedical purposes.

(c) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no physician in this state shall be punished, or denied any right or privilege, for having recommended marijuana to a patient for medical purposes.

(d) Section 11357, relating to the possession of marijuana, and Section 11358, relating to the cultivation of marijuana, shall not apply to a patient, or to a patient’s primary caregiver, who possesses or cultivates marijuana for the personal medical purposes of the patient upon the written or oral recommendation or approval of a physician.

(e) For the purposes of this section, “primary caregiver” means the individual designated by the person exempted under this section who has consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety of that person.

HS 11362.7. For purposes of this article, the following definitions shall apply:

(a) “Attending physician” means an individual who possesses a license in good standing to practice medicine or osteopathy issued by the Medical Board of California or the Osteopathic Medical Board of California and who has taken responsibility for an aspect of the medical care, treatment, diagnosis, counseling, or referral of a patient and who has conducted a medical examination of that patient before recording in the patient’s medical record the physician’s assessment of whether the patient has a serious medical condition and whether the medical use of marijuana is appropriate.

(b) “Department” means the State Department of Health Services.

(c) “Person with an identification card” means an individual who is a qualified patient who has applied for and received a valid identification card pursuant to this article.

(d) “Primary caregiver” means the individual, designated by a qualified patient or by a person with an identification card, who has consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety of that patient or person, and may include any of the following:

(1) In any case in which a qualified patient or person with an identification card receives medical care or supportive services, or both, from a clinic licensed pursuant to Chapter 1 (commencing with Section 1200) of Division 2, a health care facility licensed pursuant to Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 1250) of Division 2, a residential care facility for persons with chronic life-threatening illness licensed pursuant to Chapter 3.01 (commencing with Section 1568.01) of Division 2, a residential care facility for the elderly licensed pursuant to Chapter 3.2 (commencing with Section 1569) of Division 2, a hospice, or a home health agency licensed pursuant to Chapter 8 (commencing with Section 1725) of Division 2, the owner or operator, or no more than three employees who are designated by the owner or operator, of the clinic, facility, hospice, or home health agency, if designated as a primary caregiver by that qualified patient or person with an identification card.

(2) An individual who has been designated as a primary caregiver by more than one qualified patient or person with an identification card, if every qualified patient or person with an identification card who has designated that individual as a primary caregiver resides in the same city or county as the primary caregiver.

(3) An individual who has been designated as a primary caregiver by a qualified patient or person with an identification card who resides in a city or county other than that of the primary caregiver, if the individual has not been designated as a primary caregiver by any other qualified patient or person with an identification card.

(e) A primary caregiver shall be at least 18 years of age, unless the primary caregiver is the parent of a minor child who is a qualified patient or a person with an identification card or the primary caregiver is a person otherwise entitled to make medical decisions under state law pursuant to Sections 6922, 7002, 7050, or 7120 of the Family Code.
(f) “Qualified patient” means a person who is entitled to the protections of Section 11362.5, but who does not have an identification card issued pursuant to this article.

(g) “Identification card” means a document issued by the State Department of Health Services that document identifies a person authorized to engage in the medical use of marijuana and the person’s designated primary caregiver, if any.

(h) “Serious medical condition” means all of the following medical conditions:

(1) Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

(2) Anorexia.

(3) Arthritis.

(4) Cachexia.

(5) Cancer.

(6) Chronic pain.

(7) Glaucoma.

(8) Migraine.

(9) Persistent muscle spasms, including, but not limited to, spasms associated with multiple sclerosis.

(10) Seizures, including, but not limited to, seizures associated with epilepsy.

(11) Severe nausea.

(12) Any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either:

(A) Substantially limits the ability of the person to conduct one or more major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-336).

(B) If not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the patient’s safety or physical or mental health.

(i) “Written documentation” means accurate reproductions of those portions of a patient’s medical records that have been created by the attending physician, that contain the information required by paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 11362.715, and that the patient may submit to a county health department or the county’s designee as part of an application for an identification card.

HS 11362.71. (a) (1) The department shall establish and maintain a voluntary program for the issuance of identification cards to qualified patients who satisfy the requirements of this article and voluntarily apply to the identification card program.

(2) The department shall establish and maintain a 24-hour, toll-free telephone number that will enable state and local law enforcement officers to have immediate access to information necessary to verify the validity of an identification card issued by the department, until a cost-effective Internet Web-based system can be developed for this purpose.

(b) Every county health department, or the county’s designee, shall do all of the following:

(1) Provide applications upon request to individuals seeking to join the identification card program.

(2) Receive and process completed applications in accordance with Section 11362.72.

(3) Maintain records of identification card programs.

(4) Utilize protocols developed by the department pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d).

(5) Issue identification cards developed by the department to approved applicants and designated primary caregivers.

(c) The county board of supervisors may designate another health-related governmental or nongovernmental entity or organization to perform the functions described in subdivision (b), except for an entity or organization that cultivates or distributes marijuana.

(d) The department shall develop all of the following:

(1) Protocols that shall be used by a county health department or the county’s designee to implement the responsibilities described in subdivision (b), including, but not limited to, protocols to confirm the accuracy of information contained in an application and to protect the confidentiality of program records.

(2) Application forms that shall be issued to requesting applicants.

(3) An identification card that identifies a person authorized to engage in the medical use of marijuana and an identification card that identifies the person’s designated primary caregiver, if any. The two identification cards developed pursuant to this paragraph shall be easily distinguishable from each other.

(e) No person or designated primary caregiver in possession of a valid identification card shall be subject to arrest for possession, transportation, delivery, or cultivation of medical marijuana in an amount established pursuant to this article, unless there is reasonable cause to believe that the information contained in the card is false or falsified, the card has been obtained by means of fraud, or the person is otherwise in violation of the provisions of this article.
(f) It shall not be necessary for a person to obtain an identification card in order to claim the protections of Section 11362.5.

HS 11362.715. (a) A person who seeks an identification card shall pay the fee, as provided in Section 11362.755, and provide all of the following to the county health department or the county’s designee on a form developed and provided by the department:

(1) The name of the person, and proof of his or her residency within the county.

(2) Written documentation by the attending physician in the person’ s medical records stating that the person has been diagnosed with a serious medical condition and that the medical use of marijuana is appropriate.

(3) The name, office address, office telephone number, and California medical license number of the person’s attending physician.

(4) The name and the duties of the primary caregiver.

(5) A government-issued photo identification card of the person and of the designated primary caregiver, if any. If the applicant is a person under 18 years of age, a certified copy of a birth certificate shall be deemed sufficient proof of identity.

(b) If the person applying for an identification card lacks the capacity to make medical decisions, the application may be made by the person’s legal representative, including, but not limited to, any of the following:

(1) A conservator with authority to make medical decisions.

(2) An attorney-in-fact under a durable power of attorney for health care or surrogate decisionmaker authorized under another advanced health care directive.

(3) Any other individual authorized by statutory or decisional law to make medical decisions for the person.

(c) The legal representative described in subdivision (b) may also designate in the application an individual, including himself or herself, to serve as a primary caregiver for the person, provided that the individual meets the definition of a primary caregiver.

(d) The person or legal representative submitting the written information and documentation described in subdivision (a) shall retain a copy thereof.

11362.72. (a) Within 30 days of receipt of an application for an identification card, a county health department or the county’s designee shall do all of the following:

(1) For purposes of processing the application, verify that the information contained in the application is accurate. If the person is less than 18 years of age, the county health department or its designee shall also contact the parent with legal authority to make medical decisions, legal guardian, or other person or entity with legal authority to make medical decisions, to verify the information.

(2) Verify with the Medical Board of California or the Osteopathic Medical Board of California that the attending physician has a license in good standing to practice medicine or osteopathy in the state.

(3) Contact the attending physician by facsimile, telephone, or mail to confirm that the medical records submitted by the patient are a true and correct copy of those contained in the physician’s office records. When contacted by a county health department or the county’ s designee, the attending physician shall confirm or deny that the contents of the medical records are accurate.

(4) Take a photograph or otherwise obtain an electronically transmissible image of the applicant and of the designated primary caregiver, if any.

(5) Approve or deny the application. If an applicant who meets the requirements of Section 11362.715 can establish that an identification card is needed on an emergency basis, the county or its designee shall issue a temporary identification card that shall be valid for 30 days from the date of issuance. The county, or its designee, may extend the temporary identification card for no more than 30 days at a time, so long as the applicant continues to meet the requirements of this paragraph.

(b) If the county health department or the county’s designee approves the application, it shall, within 24 hours, or by the end of the next working day of approving the application, electronically transmit the following information to the department:

(1) A unique user identification number of the applicant.

(2) The date of expiration of the identification card.

(3) The name and telephone number of the county health department or the county’s designee that has approved the application.

(c) The county health department or the county’s designee shall issue an identification card to the applicant and to his or her designated primary caregiver, if any, within five working days of approving the application.

(d) In any case involving an incomplete application, the applicant shall assume responsibility for rectifying the deficiency. The county shall have 14 days from the receipt of information from the applicant pursuant to this subdivision to approve or deny the application.

11362.735. (a) An identification card issued by the county health department shall be serially numbered and shall contain all of the following:

(1) A unique user identification number of the cardholder.

(2) The date of expiration of the identification card.

(3) The name and telephone number of the county health department or the county’s designee that has approved the application.

(4) A 24-hour, toll-free telephone number, to be maintained by the department, that will enable state and local law enforcement officers to have immediate access to information necessary to verify the validity of the card.

(5) Photo identification of the cardholder.

(b) A separate identification card shall be issued to the person’s designated primary caregiver, if any, and shall include a photo identification of the caregiver.

11362.74. (a) The county health department or the county’s designee may deny an application only for any of the following reasons:

(1) The applicant did not provide the information required by Section 11362.715, and upon notice of the deficiency pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 11362.72, did not provide the information within 30 days.

(2) The county health department or the county’s designee determines that the information provided was false.

(3) The applicant does not meet the criteria set forth in this article.

(b) Any person whose application has been denied pursuant to subdivision (a) may not reapply for six months from the date of denial unless otherwise authorized by the county health department or the county’s designee or by a court of competent jurisdiction.

(c) Any person whose application has been denied pursuant to subdivision (a) may appeal that decision to the department. The county health department or the county’s designee shall make available a telephone number or address to which the denied applicant can direct an appeal.
11362.745. (a) An identification card shall be valid for a period of one year.

(b) Upon annual renewal of an identification card, the county health department or its designee shall verify all new information and may verify any other information that has not changed. (c) The county health department or the county’s designee shall transmit its determination of approval or denial of a renewal to the department.

11362.755. (a) The department shall establish application and renewal fees for persons seeking to obtain or renew identification cards that are sufficient to cover the expenses incurred by the department, including the startup cost, the cost of reduced fees for Medi-Cal beneficiaries in accordance with subdivision (b), the cost of identifying and developing a cost-effective Internet Web-based system, and the cost of maintaining the 24-hour toll-free telephone number. Each county health department or the county’s designee may charge an additional fee for all costs incurred by the county or the county’s designee for administering the program pursuant to this article.

(b) Upon satisfactory proof of participation and eligibility in the Medi-Cal program, a Medi-Cal beneficiary shall receive a 50 percent reduction in the fees established pursuant to this section.

11362.76. (a) A person who possesses an identification card shall:

(1) Within seven days, notify the county health department or the county’s designee of any change in the person’s attending physician or designated primary caregiver, if any.

(2) Annually submit to the county health department or the county’ s designee the following:

(A) Updated written documentation of the person’s serious medical condition.

(B) The name and duties of the person’s designated primary caregiver, if any, for the forthcoming year.

(b) If a person who possesses an identification card fails to comply with this section, the card shall be deemed expired. If an identification card expires, the identification card of any designated primary caregiver of the person shall also expire.

(c) If the designated primary caregiver has been changed, the previous primary caregiver shall return his or her identification card to the department or to the county health department or the county’s designee.

(d) If the owner or operator or an employee of the owner or operator of a provider has been designated as a primary caregiver pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (d) of Section 11362.7, of the qualified patient or person with an identification card, the owner or operator shall notify the county health department or the county’s designee, pursuant to Section 11362.715, if a change in the designated primary caregiver has occurred.

11362.765. (a) Subject to the requirements of this article, the individuals specified in subdivision (b) shall not be subject, on that sole basis, to criminal liability under Section 11357, 11358, 11359, 11360, 11366, 11366.5, or 11570. However, nothing in this section shall authorize the individual to smoke or otherwise consume marijuana unless otherwise authorized by this article, nor shall anything in this section authorize any individual or group to cultivate or distribute marijuana for profit.

(b) Subdivision (a) shall apply to all of the following:

(1) A qualified patient or a person with an identification card who transports or processes marijuana for his or her own personal medical use.

(2) A designated primary caregiver who transports, processes, administers, delivers, or gives away marijuana for medical purposes, in amounts not exceeding those established in subdivision (a) of Section 11362.77, only to the qualified patient of the primary caregiver, or to the person with an identification card who has designated the individual as a primary caregiver.

(3) Any individual who provides assistance to a qualified patient or a person with an identification card, or his or her designated primary caregiver, in administering medical marijuana to the qualified patient or person or acquiring the skills necessary to cultivate or administer marijuana for medical purposes to the qualified patient or person.

(c) A primary caregiver who receives compensation for actual expenses, including reasonable compensation incurred for services provided to an eligible qualified patient or person with an identification card to enable that person to use marijuana under this article, or for payment for out-of-pocket expenses incurred in providing those services, or both, shall not, on the sole basis of that fact, be subject to prosecution or punishment under Section 11359 or 11360.
11362.77. (a) A qualified patient or primary caregiver may possess no more than eight ounces of dried marijuana per qualified patient. In addition, a qualified patient or primary caregiver may also maintain no more than six mature or 12 immature marijuana plants per qualified patient.
(b) If a qualified patient or primary caregiver has a doctor’s recommendation that this quantity does not meet the qualified patient’ s medical needs, the qualified patient or primary caregiver may possess an amount of marijuana consistent with the patient’s needs.
(c) Counties and cities may retain or enact medical marijuana guidelines allowing qualified patients or primary caregivers to exceed the state limits set forth in subdivision (a).
(d) Only the dried mature processed flowers of female cannabis plant or the plant conversion shall be considered when determining allowable quantities of marijuana under this section.

(e) The Attorney General may recommend modifications to the possession or cultivation limits set forth in this section. These recommendations, if any, shall be made to the Legislature no later than December 1, 2005, and may be made only after public comment and consultation with interested organizations, including, but not limited to, patients, health care professionals, researchers, law enforcement, and local governments. Any recommended modification shall be consistent with the intent of this article and shall be based on currently available scientific research.
(f) A qualified patient or a person holding a valid identification card, or the designated primary caregiver of that qualified patient or person, may possess amounts of marijuana consistent with this article.

HS 11362.775. Qualified patients, persons with valid identification cards, and the designated primary caregivers of qualified patients and persons with identification cards, who associate within the State of California in order collectively or cooperatively to cultivate marijuana for medical purposes, shall not solely on the basis of that fact be subject to state criminal sanctions under Section 11357, 11358, 11359, 11360, 11366, 11366.5, or 11570.

11362.78. A state or local law enforcement agency or officer shall not refuse to accept an identification card issued by the department unless the state or local law enforcement agency or officer has reasonable cause to believe that the information contained in the card is false or fraudulent, or the card is being used fraudulently.

11362.785. (a) Nothing in this article shall require any accommodation of any medical use of marijuana on the property or premises of any place of employment or during the hours of employment or on the property or premises of any jail, correctional facility, or other type of penal institution in which prisoners reside or persons under arrest are detained.

(b) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), a person shall not be prohibited or prevented from obtaining and submitting the written information and documentation necessary to apply for an identification card on the basis that the person is incarcerated in a jail, correctional facility, or other penal institution in which prisoners reside or persons under arrest are detained.

(c) Nothing in this article shall prohibit a jail, correctional facility, or other penal institution in which prisoners reside or persons under arrest are detained, from permitting a prisoner or a person under arrest who has an identification card, to use marijuana for medical purposes under circumstances that will not endanger the health or safety of other prisoners or the security of the facility.

(d) Nothing in this article shall require a governmental, private, or any other health insurance provider or health care service plan to be liable for any claim for reimbursement for the medical use of marijuana.

11362.79. Nothing in this article shall authorize a qualified patient or person with an identification card to engage in the smoking of medical marijuana under any of the following circumstances:

(a) In any place where smoking is prohibited by law.

(b) In or within 1,000 feet of the grounds of a school, recreation center, or youth center, unless the medical use occurs within a residence.

(c) On a schoolbus.

(d) While in a motor vehicle that is being operated.

(e) While operating a boat.

11362.795. (a) (1) Any criminal defendant who is eligible to use marijuana pursuant to Section 11362.5 may request that the court confirm that he or she is allowed to use medical marijuana while he or she is on probation or released on bail.

(2) The court’s decision and the reasons for the decision shall be stated on the record and an entry stating those reasons shall be made in the minutes of the court.

(3) During the period of probation or release on bail, if a physician recommends that the probationer or defendant use medical marijuana, the probationer or defendant may request a modification of the conditions of probation or bail to authorize the use of medical marijuana.

(4) The court’s consideration of the modification request authorized by this subdivision shall comply with the requirements of this section.

(b) (1) Any person who is to be released on parole from a jail, state prison, school, road camp, or other state or local institution of confinement and who is eligible to use medical marijuana pursuant to Section 11362.5 may request that he or she be allowed to use medical marijuana during the period he or she is released on parole. A parolee’s written conditions of parole shall reflect whether or not a request for a modification of the conditions of his or her parole to use medical marijuana was made, and whether the request was granted or denied.

(2) During the period of the parole, where a physician recommends that the parolee use medical marijuana, the parolee may request a modification of the conditions of the parole to authorize the use of medical marijuana.

(3) Any parolee whose request to use medical marijuana while on parole was denied may pursue an administrative appeal of the decision. Any decision on the appeal shall be in writing and shall reflect the reasons for the decision.

(4) The administrative consideration of the modification request authorized by this subdivision shall comply with the requirements of this section.

11362.8. No professional licensing board may impose a civil penalty or take other disciplinary action against a licensee based solely on the fact that the licensee has performed acts that are necessary or appropriate to carry out the licensee’s role as a designated primary caregiver to a person who is a qualified patient or who possesses a lawful identification card issued pursuant to Section 11362.72. However, this section shall not apply to acts performed by a physician relating to the discussion or recommendation of the medical use of marijuana to a patient. These discussions or recommendations, or both, shall be governed by Section 11362.5.

11362.81. (a) A person specified in subdivision (b) shall be subject to the following penalties:

(1) For the first offense, imprisonment in the county jail for no more than six months or a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000), or both.

(2) For a second or subsequent offense, imprisonment in the county jail for no more than one year, or a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000), or both.

(b) Subdivision (a) applies to any of the following:

(1) A person who fraudulently represents a medical condition or fraudulently provides any material misinformation to a physician, county health department or the county’s designee, or state or local law enforcement agency or officer, for the purpose of falsely obtaining an identification card.

(2) A person who steals or fraudulently uses any person’s identification card in order to acquire, possess, cultivate, transport, use, produce, or distribute marijuana.

(3) A person who counterfeits, tampers with, or fraudulently produces an identification card.

(4) A person who breaches the confidentiality requirements of this article to information provided to, or contained in the records of, the department or of a county health department or the county’s designee pertaining to an identification card program.

(c) In addition to the penalties prescribed in subdivision (a), any person described in subdivision (b) may be precluded from attempting to obtain, or obtaining or using, an identification card for a period of up to six months at the discretion of the court.

(d) In addition to the requirements of this article, the Attorney General shall develop and adopt appropriate guidelines to ensure the security and nondiversion of marijuana grown for medical use by patients qualified under the Compassionate Use Act of 1996.

11362.82. If any section, subdivision, sentence, clause, phrase, or portion of this article is for any reason held invalid or unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, that portion shall be deemed a separate, distinct, and independent provision, and that holding shall not affect the validity of the remaining portion thereof.

11362.83. Nothing in this article shall prevent a city or other local governing body from adopting and enforcing laws consistent with this article.

SEC. 3. No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for certain costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district because in that regard this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.

In addition, no reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for other costs mandated by the state because this act includes additional revenue that is specifically intended to fund the costs of the state mandate in an amount sufficient to fund the cost of the state mandate, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code.

HS 11362.9. (a) (1) It is the intent of the Legislature that the state commission objective scientific research by the premier research institute of the world, the University of California, regarding the efficacy and safety of administering marijuana as part of medical treatment. If the Regents of the University of California, by appropriate resolution, accept this responsibility, the University of California shall create a three-year program, to be known as the California Marijuana Research Program.

(2) The program shall develop and conduct studies intended to ascertain the general medical safety and efficacy of marijuana and, if found valuable, shall develop medical guidelines for the appropriate administration and use of marijuana.

(b) The program may immediately solicit proposals for research projects to be included in the marijuana studies. Program requirements to be used when evaluating responses to its solicitation for proposals, shall include, but not be limited to, all of the following:

(1) Proposals shall demonstrate the use of key personnel, including clinicians or scientists and support personnel, who are prepared to develop a program of research regarding marijuana’s general medical efficacy and safety.

(2) Proposals shall contain procedures for outreach to patients with various medical conditions who may be suitable participants in research on marijuana.

(3) Proposals shall contain provisions for a patient registry.

(4) Proposals shall contain provisions for an information system that is designed to record information about possible study participants, investigators, and clinicians, and deposit and analyze data that accrues as part of clinical trials.

(5) Proposals shall contain protocols suitable for research on marijuana, addressing patients diagnosed with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cancer, glaucoma, or seizures or muscle spasms associated with a chronic, debilitating condition. The proposal may also include research on other serious illnesses, provided that resources are available and medical information justifies the research.

(6) Proposals shall demonstrate the use of a specimen laboratory capable of housing plasma, urine, and other specimens necessary to study the concentration of cannabinoids in various tissues, as well as housing specimens for studies of toxic effects of marijuana.

(7) Proposals shall demonstrate the use of a laboratory capable of analyzing marijuana, provided to the program under this section, for purity and cannabinoid content and the capacity to detect contaminants.

(c) In order to ensure objectivity in evaluating proposals, the program shall use a peer review process that is modeled on the process used by the National Institutes of Health, and that guards against funding research that is biased in favor of or against particular outcomes. Peer reviewers shall be selected for their expertise in the scientific substance and methods of the proposed research, and their lack of bias or conflict of interest regarding the applicants or the topic of an approach taken in the proposed research. Peer reviewers shall judge research proposals on several criteria, foremost among which shall be both of the following:

(1) The scientific merit of the research plan, including whether the research design and experimental procedures are potentially biased for or against a particular outcome.

(2) Researchers’ expertise in the scientific substance and methods of the proposed research, and their lack of bias or conflict of interest regarding the topic of, and the approach taken in, the proposed research.

(d) If the program is administered by the Regents of the University of California, any grant research proposals approved by the program shall also require review and approval by the research advisory panel.

(e) It is the intent of the Legislature that the program be established as follows:

(1) The program shall be located at one or more University of California campuses that have a core of faculty experienced in organizing multidisciplinary scientific endeavors and, in particular, strong experience in clinical trials involving psychopharmacologic agents. The campuses at which research under the auspices of the program is to take place shall accommodate the administrative offices, including the director of the program, as well as a data management unit, and facilities for storage of specimens.

(2) When awarding grants under this section, the program shall utilize principles and parameters of the other well-tested statewide research programs administered by the University of California, modeled after programs administered by the National Institutes of Health, including peer review evaluation of the scientific merit of applications.

(3) The scientific and clinical operations of the program shall occur, partly at University of California campuses, and partly at other postsecondary institutions, that have clinicians or scientists with expertise to conduct the required studies. Criteria for selection of research locations shall include the elements listed in subdivision (b) and, additionally, shall give particular weight to the organizational plan, leadership qualities of the program director, and plans to involve investigators and patient populations from multiple sites.

(4) The funds received by the program shall be allocated to various research studies in accordance with a scientific plan developed by the Scientific Advisory Council. As the first wave of studies is completed, it is anticipated that the program will receive requests for funding of additional studies. These requests shall be reviewed by the Scientific Advisory Council.

(5) The size, scope, and number of studies funded shall be commensurate with the amount of appropriated and available program funding.

(f) All personnel involved in implementing approved proposals shall be authorized as required by Section 11604.

(g) Studies conducted pursuant to this section shall include the greatest amount of new scientific research possible on the medical uses of, and medical hazards associated with, marijuana. The program shall consult with the Research Advisory Panel analogous agencies in other states, and appropriate federal agencies in an attempt to avoid duplicative research and the wasting of research dollars.

(h) The program shall make every effort to recruit qualified patients and qualified physicians from throughout the state.

(i) The marijuana studies shall employ state-of-the-art research methodologies.

(j) The program shall ensure that all marijuana used in the studies is of the appropriate medical quality and shall be obtained from the National Institute on Drug Abuse or any other federal agency designated to supply marijuana for authorized research. If these federal agencies fail to provide a supply of adequate quality and quantity within six months of the effective date of this section, the Attorney General shall provide an adequate supply pursuant to Section 11478.

(k) The program may review, approve, or incorporate studies and research by independent groups presenting scientifically valid protocols for medical research, regardless of whether the areas of study are being researched by the committee.

(l) (1) To enhance understanding of the efficacy and adverse effects of marijuana as a pharmacological agent, the program shall conduct focused controlled clinical trials on the usefulness of marijuana in patients diagnosed with AIDS or HIV, cancer, glaucoma, or seizures or muscle spasms associated with a chronic, debilitating condition. The program may add research on other serious illnesses, provided that resources are available and medical information justifies the research. The studies shall focus on comparisons of both the efficacy and safety of methods of administering the drug to patients, including inhalational, tinctural, and oral, evaluate possible uses of marijuana as a primary or adjunctive treatment, and develop further information on optimal dosage, timing, mode of administration, and variations in the effects of different cannabinoids and varieties of marijuana.

(2) The program shall examine the safety of marijuana in patients with various medical disorders, including marijuana’s interaction with other drugs, relative safety of inhalation versus oral forms, and the effects on mental function in medically ill persons.

(3) The program shall be limited to providing for objective scientific research to ascertain the efficacy and safety of marijuana as part of medical treatment, and should not be construed as encouraging or sanctioning the social or recreational use of marijuana.

(m) (1) Subject to paragraph (2), the program shall, prior to any approving proposals, seek to obtain research protocol guidelines from the National Institutes of Health and shall, if the National Institutes of Health issues research protocol guidelines, comply with those guidelines.

(2) If, after a reasonable period of time of not less than six months and not more than a year has elapsed from the date the program seeks to obtain guidelines pursuant to paragraph (1), no guidelines have been approved, the program may proceed using the research protocol guidelines it develops.

(n) In order to maximize the scope and size of the marijuana studies, the program may do any of the following:

(1) Solicit, apply for, and accept funds from foundations, private individuals, and all other funding sources that can be used to expand the scope or timeframe of the marijuana studies that are authorized under this section. The program shall not expend more than 5 percent of its General Fund allocation in efforts to obtain money from outside sources.

(2) Include within the scope of the marijuana studies other marijuana research projects that are independently funded and that meet the requirements set forth in subdivisions (a) to (c), inclusive. In no case shall the program accept any funds that are offered with any conditions other than that the funds be used to study the efficacy and safety of marijuana as part of medical treatment. Any donor shall be advised that funds given for purposes of this section will be used to study both the possible benefits and detriments of marijuana and that he or she will have no control over the use of these funds.

(o) (1) Within six months of the effective date of this section, the program shall report to the Legislature, the Governor, and the Attorney General on the progress of the marijuana studies.

(2) Thereafter, the program shall issue a report to the Legislature every six months detailing the progress of the studies. The interim reports required under this paragraph shall include, but not be limited to, data on all of the following:

(A) The names and number of diseases or conditions under study.

(B) The number of patients enrolled in each study by disease.

(C) Any scientifically valid preliminary findings.

(p) If the Regents of the University of California implement this section, the President of the University of California shall appoint a multidisciplinary Scientific Advisory Council, not to exceed 15 members, to provide policy guidance in the creation and implementation of the program. Members shall be chosen on the basis of scientific expertise. Members of the council shall serve on a voluntary basis, with reimbursement for expenses incurred in the course of their participation. The members shall be reimbursed for travel and other necessary expenses incurred in their performance of the duties of the council.

(q) No more than 10 percent of the total funds appropriated be used for all aspects of the administration of this section.

(r) This section shall be implemented only to the extent that funding for its purposes is appropriated by the Legislature in the annual Budget Act.

11366. Every person who opens or maintains any place for the purpose of unlawfully selling, giving away, or using any controlled substance which is (1) specified in subdivision (b), (c), or (e), or paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 11054, specified in paragraph (13), (14), (15), or (20) of subdivision (d) of Section 11054, or specified in subdivision (b), (c), paragraph (1) or (2) of subdivision (d), or paragraph (3) of subdivision (e) of Section 11055, or (2) which is a narcotic drug classified in Schedule III, IV, or V, shall be punished by imprisonment in the county jail for a period of not more than one year or the state prison.

11366.5. (a) Any person who has under his or her management or control any building, room, space, or enclosure, either as an owner, lessee, agent, employee, or mortgagee, who knowingly rents, leases, or makes available for use, with or without compensation, the building, room, space, or enclosure for the purpose of unlawfully manufacturing, storing, or distributing any controlled substance for sale or distribution shall be punished by imprisonment in the county jail for not more than one year, or in the state prison.

(b) Any person who has under his or her management or control any building, room, space, or enclosure, either as an owner, lessee, agent, employee, or mortgagee, who knowingly allows the building, room, space, or enclosure to be fortified to suppress law enforcement entry in order to further the sale of any amount of cocaine base as specified in paragraph (1) of subdivision (f) of Section 11054, cocaine as specified in paragraph (6) of subdivision (b) of Section 11055, heroin, phencyclidine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, or lysergic acid diethylamide and who obtains excessive profits from the use of the building, room, space, or enclosure shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for two, three, or four years.

(c) Any person who violates subdivision (a) after previously being convicted of a violation of subdivision (a) shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for two, three, or four years.

(d) For the purposes of this section, “excessive profits” means the receipt of consideration of a value substantially higher than fair market value.

HS 11570. Every building or place used for the purpose of unlawfully selling, serving, storing, keeping, manufacturing, or giving away any controlled substance, precursor, or analog specified in this division, and every building or place wherein or upon which those acts take place, is a nuisance which shall be enjoined, abated, and prevented, and for which damages may be recovered, whether it is a public or private nuisance.

YoVenice.com … neighborhood information and more…

I often find myself on this great local website? Yovenice.com

It keeps you up to date with so much important information about what is going on in The Venice Beach Community!

They have an awesome Surf-Skate-Bike Forum that has weekly photo submissions and they make a great referance point for finding out info about our community!

Check them out. YoVenice.com

 

Hemp for Victory! The Original 1942 government film. Take a look.

Produced by the US Government in 1942…Interesting to learn that Dupont Chemical funded the anti- hemp / marijuana effort. This is because they had patents on new synthetic fibers and Hemp had a new machine that would put them out of business if hemp were to be used for clothes. Dupont also sold – and still does many of the chemicals to wood pulp producers… so we continue to cut down forests… when Hemp could save millions of trees, be used as an alternative bio fuel and the US could easily grow enough hemp to eliminate the need for oil… so Big oil does not want hemp legal either. Neither do the drug companies… they can’t patent it. They would rather keep selling you their drugs. By keeping it illegal the lawyers, courts etc… also make a buck. You can only get high from the female flower – nobody has ever died from smoking a joint. Of course the alcohol and tobacco companies would prefer to keep their monopoly as well. So we have all the BIG Corporate players… against legalizing it. Yet if it were legalized – we would solve many issues and have a multi billion dollar hemp economy as it can be used for 1000’s of products. A few other good films to watch are run from the cure & hemp conspiracy – Google it!